Maximum Strength Viagra: What’s the Highest Dose of Viagra?

100 mg

Never take more than one dose of Viagra a day

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Disclaimer: This information isn’t a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should never rely upon this article for specific medical advice. If you have any questions or concerns, please talk to your doctor.

Maximum Strength Viagra

According to the FDA’s Prescribing Information, 100 mg is the maximum dose of Viagra that most people can safely take in a single day, if prescribed by their physician. But the ideal Viagra dose isn’t about finding the most medication you can handle. It’s about using the lowest dose that you can take safely that still gets the results you want while minimizing side effects. That’s why the starting dose for Viagra is 50mg for most people. The FDA recommends a lower starting dose for people with certain health conditions, like kidney or liver disease, and for people on certain medications, like antiretrovirals (ARVs) used to treat HIV/AIDS.

Your doctor may recommend the maximum dose of Viagra (100 mg) or the lowest dose (25 mg) based on many factors. Here are just a few:

  • Age
  • Cardiovascular health
  • Pre-existing conditions
  • How often you use the medication
  • See the IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION for Viagra to learn about other factors that may impact Viagra dosing

You should always follow your doctor’s dosing instructions, and never take more than one dose of Viagra per day or exceed 100 mg of Viagra in 24 hours.

Changing Your Viagra Dose

Viagra may not work the first time for a number of reasons, including:

It’s important to talk to your doctor about your expectations for Viagra. And that includes answering these two essential questions:

  1. How often do you plan to have sex?
  2. How comfortable are you scheduling sex around onset and effective times for Viagra?

Viagra isn’t right for everyone, and you should work with your doctor to make sure Viagra is a safe choice for you. If you’re taking any other medications—like nitrates or alpha-blockers—your doctor may not recommend Viagra. For more information about the risks and benefits of Viagra, see IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION. Depending on your medical history, symptoms, and preferences, your doctor may prescribe the lowest dose (25 mg) to reduce the risk of side effects. If Viagra isn’t working—and you’ve followed all of your doctor’s recommendations —they may prescribe a higher dose or switch you to another medication.

You should never up your dose, double your dose, or change how you take ED medication without the help of your doctor. If Viagra isn’t working the way you’d like, or you’re experiencing side effects, talk to your doctor immediately.

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