Cialis vs. Sildenafil

A brief comparison of Sildenafil (Viagra) with Tadalafil (Cialis) can be made by examining how they can be used (daily versus ‘as needed’), the time it takes for them to work, the length of time they continue to work, the restrictions on how they can be taken, the contraindications to their use, and the side effects each of them might cause.
 
Yet, one issue is rarely the sole factor men consider when taking a medication for erectile dysfunction. It is the interplay between a man’s social circumstances (and that of their partner), his need for a rapid onset of medication activity versus a prolonged duration of action, the individual reaction to the drug in terms of side effects, a person’s prior medical history, the other medications they take, and the very personal definition of what it means to achieve an erection satisfactory for sexual activity.

 
Sildenafil (Viagra) can be effective in as little as 1 hour, while Cialis might not take effect for 2 hours, though for some patients these medicines can work more rapidly. In fact, Cialis (tadalafil) might work in as few as 30 minutes and some patients find that Viagra (sildenafil) can start to have an effect in 15 minutes. Nevertheless, each should be approached as reliably taking effect in 1 hour for Viagra and in 2 hours for Cialis.
 
Viagra leaves the body in about 6 to 8 hours, while Cialis can work for 24 to 36 hours. That means that while they are both very effective–approximately 75% of patients will achieve a satisfactory erection with either–Viagra (sildenafil) will work reliably for 6-8 hours but Cialis (tadalafil) will work for up to 36 hours. Nevertheless, the effect of a medication may not be needed beyond 6 or 8 hours, and any side effects (in addition to any positive effect) they cause will fade rapidly as the medication leaves the bloodstream. That means that someone who experiences nasal congestion or flushing when they use either Cialis (tadalafil) or Viagra (sildenafil) may find it useful to take the shorter acting medication, Viagra (sildenafil). It might be worth a bit of nasal congestion during the time when sex will occur but there would be no reason to endure a stuffy nose once sexual intimacy had concluded.
 
Sometimes, a peculiar side effect might prevent a person from taking Sildenafil but not Tadalafil. Cialis (Tadalafil) is more likely to cause back pain than Sildenafil (Viagra) but seems to cause less nasal congestion. A man with a slipped disc may not like the idea of getting back pain even if it is just a side effect of medicine (and eliminate Cialis as a choice) while another patient with allergies may want to avoid taking something that will cause their sinuses to feel congested (and eliminate Viagra from consideration).
 
The length of time a medicine works is important to some. Let’s consider two men. One might be able to predict when sexual activity will occur. A drug that works rapidly and leaves his system quickly thereafter would be perfect, as with Sildenafil (Viagra). Another man might know sex will occur during the course of a weekend but cannot know exactly when that will occur. For him, a drug with a prolonged period of activity is far more important than how long it takes for a medicine to start working. He would prefer tadalafil (Cialis).

Also, Cialis can be taken in a low daily dose and for a solid subset of patients, this is preferred. Again, it is never as simple as considering just one factor. There is a good deal of trial and error in finding the right medicine, the most effective dose, and the plan that results in the fewest side effects. Sometimes, a side effect is worth the benefit, sometimes not. On occasion, a man will be on medications that require a dose adjustment. Even a simple antibiotic like erythromycin can alter how the body handles either medication and the dose must be adjusted. Grapefruit juice can do so as well. Some medications lower blood pressure and each of these medications, Viagra or Cialis, can add to that blood pressure lowering effect and be quite dangerous. Nitrates, nitrites, and nitroglycerin can all be dangerous when combined with medications that treat erectile dysfunction.

The key is to get educated and share all your information with each of your healthcare providers. Only by doing so can a safe, effective, and personalized treatment plan be crafted with your goals and your safety preserved.